Focus on the representation semantics, leave the transfer semantics to HTTP

A couple of days ago I was reading the latest OAuth 2.0 Authorization Server Metadata document version and my eye got caught on one sentence. On section 3.2, the document states

A successful response MUST use the 200 OK HTTP status code and return a JSON object using the “application/json” content type (…)

My first reaction was thinking that this specification was being redundant: of course a 200 OK HTTP status should be returned on a successful response. However, that “MUST” in the text made me think: is a 200 really the only acceptable response status code for a successful response? In my opinion, the answer is no.

For instance, if caching and ETags are being used, the client can send a conditional GET request (see Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP/1.1): Conditional Requests) using the If-None-Match header, for which a 304 (Not Modified) status code is perfectly acceptable. Another example is if the metadata location changes and the server responds with a 301 (Moved Permanently) or a 302 (Found) status code.Does that means the request was unsuccessful? In my opinion, no. It just means that the request should be followed by a subsequent request to another location.

So, why does this little observation deserve a blog post?
Well, mainly because it reflects two common tendencies when designing HTTP APIs (or HTTP interfaces):

  • First, the tendency to redefine transfer semantics that are already defined by HTTP.
  • Secondly, a very simplistic view of HTTP, ignoring parts such as caching and optimistic concurrency.

The HTTP specification already defines a quite rich set of mechanisms for representation transfer, and HTTP related specifications should take advantage of that. What HTTP does not define is the semantics of the representation itself. That should be the focus of specifications such as the OAuth 2.0 Authorization Server Metadata.

When defining HTTP APIs, focus on the representation semantics. The transfer semantics is already defined by the HTTP protocol.

 

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